sometimesanihilist
sometimesanihilist:

Jeannette Rankin (1880 - 1973) was the first woman to serve in the US congress, in 1916 and again in 1943. 
She fought for women’s rights, including suffrage, birth control, and equal pay. She was a lifelong pacifist and activist for peace, and worked towards an antiwar constitutional amendment. She voted against the US entering WWI, and was also the only member to vote against going to war with Japan after Pearl Harbor (and barely escaped an angry mob afterward). 
“There can be no compromise with war; it cannot be reformed or controlled; cannot be disciplined into decency or codified into common sense; for war is the slaughter of human beings, temporarily regarded as enemies, on as large a scale as possible.” (1929)

sometimesanihilist:

Jeannette Rankin (1880 - 1973) was the first woman to serve in the US congress, in 1916 and again in 1943. 

She fought for women’s rights, including suffrage, birth control, and equal pay. She was a lifelong pacifist and activist for peace, and worked towards an antiwar constitutional amendment. She voted against the US entering WWI, and was also the only member to vote against going to war with Japan after Pearl Harbor (and barely escaped an angry mob afterward). 

There can be no compromise with war; it cannot be reformed or controlled; cannot be disciplined into decency or codified into common sense; for war is the slaughter of human beings, temporarily regarded as enemies, on as large a scale as possible.” (1929)

historical-nonfiction
historical-nonfiction:

The Varangians were the elite forces of the Byzantine army- much like the Praetorian Guard of ancient Rome or the Ottoman Janissaries.  They were originally made up exclusively of Vikings (which the empire had been hiring as mercenaries since the 9th century), but after the Norman Conquest of England a bunch of exiled Anglo-Saxons were added to the mix.  By the 12th century there were so many English that it was commonly being referred to as the ‘Anglo-Varangian’ Guard.  As the empire declined, the Varangians also fell on hard times.  By the middle of the 14th century they had largely ceased to function and the last mention of them is in the first decade of the 15th century. 

historical-nonfiction:

The Varangians were the elite forces of the Byzantine army- much like the Praetorian Guard of ancient Rome or the Ottoman Janissaries.  They were originally made up exclusively of Vikings (which the empire had been hiring as mercenaries since the 9th century), but after the Norman Conquest of England a bunch of exiled Anglo-Saxons were added to the mix.  By the 12th century there were so many English that it was commonly being referred to as the ‘Anglo-Varangian’ Guard.  As the empire declined, the Varangians also fell on hard times.  By the middle of the 14th century they had largely ceased to function and the last mention of them is in the first decade of the 15th century. 

mapsontheweb
mapsontheweb:

The world as a Civilization 5 map with world wonder sites marked



The aforementioned wonders for those who aren’t familiar are as follows:
Alhambra (Spain)
Angkor Wat
Big Ben (England)
Borobudur (Indonesia)
Brandenburg Gate (Germany)
Broadway (America)
Chichen Itza (Mexico, represented by the Aztecs)
CN Tower (Canada, represented by the Iroquois)
Cristo Redentor (Brazil)
Eiffel Tower (France)
Forbidden Palace (China)
Globe Theatre (England)
Great Mosque of Djenne (Mali, represented by Songhai)
Great Wall (China)
Hagia Sophia (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)
Himeji Castle (Japan)
Kremlin (Russia)
Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italy, represented by Venice)
The Louvre (France)
Machu Picchu (Peru, represented by the Inca)
Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)
Neuschwanstein (Germany)
Notre Dame (France)
Parthenon (Greece)
The Pentagon (America)
Petra
Prora (Germany)
Pyramids (Egypt)
Red Fort (India)
Sistine Chapel
Statue of Liberty (America)
Stonehenge (England)
Sydney Opera House
Taj Mahal (India)
Terracotta Army (China)
Uffizi (Italy, represented by Venice)
And here’s a video with in-game quotes and artwork.

mapsontheweb:

The world as a Civilization 5 map with world wonder sites marked

The aforementioned wonders for those who aren’t familiar are as follows:

Alhambra (Spain)

Angkor Wat

Big Ben (England)

Borobudur (Indonesia)

Brandenburg Gate (Germany)

Broadway (America)

Chichen Itza (Mexico, represented by the Aztecs)

CN Tower (Canada, represented by the Iroquois)

Cristo Redentor (Brazil)

Eiffel Tower (France)

Forbidden Palace (China)

Globe Theatre (England)

Great Mosque of Djenne (Mali, represented by Songhai)

Great Wall (China)

Hagia Sophia (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)

Himeji Castle (Japan)

Kremlin (Russia)

Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italy, represented by Venice)

The Louvre (France)

Machu Picchu (Peru, represented by the Inca)

Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)

Neuschwanstein (Germany)

Notre Dame (France)

Parthenon (Greece)

The Pentagon (America)

Petra

Prora (Germany)

Pyramids (Egypt)

Red Fort (India)

Sistine Chapel

Statue of Liberty (America)

Stonehenge (England)

Sydney Opera House

Taj Mahal (India)

Terracotta Army (China)

Uffizi (Italy, represented by Venice)

And here’s a video with in-game quotes and artwork.

nprbooks

nprbooks:

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.

NPR’s Louisa Lim explores those events, the forgotten deaths and the Chinese government’s rewriting of the official narrative in a new book, The People’s Republic of Amnesia. Her story includes an investigation into a forgotten crackdown in the southwestern city of Chengdu — which, to this day, has never been reported.

Tang Deying holds her determination in the stubborn set of her jaw. This diminutive, disheveled, elderly woman shuffling into the room in her pink plastic flip-flops is one of the few living links to the crackdown in Chengdu during the summer of 1989.

When martial law troops opened fire on civilians in Beijing on June 4, 1989, the violence was beamed immediately into living rooms around the world. Yet it has taken a quarter-century for details to emerge of the deadly events in Chengdu that cost Tang’s 17-year-old son his life.

For 25 years, a single aim has driven Tang’s existence: seeking restitution and accountability for the death of her son, Zhou Guocong, who was fatally beaten in police custody after disappearing in the 1989 Chengdu crackdown.

"Right is right. Wrong is wrong," she told me firmly

See the rest of the story here.

Images courtesy Louisa Lim and Kim Nygaard

unhistorical

unhistorical:


March 20, 1854: The United States Republican Party is founded.

In early March 1854, the U.S. Senate passed the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which provided for the organization of the eponymous territories and deferred the issue of slavery in both to popular sovereignty. The act effectively overturned the almost sacred Missouri Compromise of 1820, which, for the past three decades, had successfully discouraged conflict between anti- and pro-slavery factions. In reaction to the act, and to the possible expansion of slavery north of the line decreed by the Missouri Compromise, a group primarily composed of ex-members of the nearly defunct Whig Party met in Wisconsin in early 1854. In July of 1854, the Republican Party was officially founded in Jackson, Michigan.

The early Republican Party was united by its rejection of the expansion of slavery, for moral, political, and economic reasons: free-market capitalism and free labor, it was argued, was the superior and more American system. Others feared the disproportionate political power held by slave-owning plantation oligarchs. Naturally, the entirety of party organizational efforts took place in the North. The 1856 Party platform rejected the repeal of the Missouri Compromise and any efforts to expand slavery into free territories; it also supported the construction of a transcontinental railroad and the “improvement of rivers and harbors… for the accommodation and security of our existing commerce”. Its first candidate for the presidency was John C. Frémont, who lost the election to James Buchanan but earned a sizable 38.5% of the popular vote. His campaign slogan, “Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Speech, Free Men, and Frémont”, was lifted from the platform of the Free Soil Party.