selfrescuingprincesssociety
selfrescuingprincesssociety:

Emmy Noether (23 March 1882 – 14 April 1935)Emmy Noether was an influential German mathematician known for her groundbreaking contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. Described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, Norbert Wiener and others as the most important woman in the history of mathematics, she revolutionized the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether’s theorem explains the fundamental connection between symmetry and conservation laws.Noether is remembered by mathematicians as an algebraist and for her work in topology. Physicists appreciate her best for her famous theorem because of its far-ranging consequences for theoretical physics and dynamic systems. She showed an acute propensity for abstract thought, which allowed her to approach problems of mathematics in fresh and original ways.Noether’s work continues to be relevant for the development of theoretical physics and mathematics and she is consistently ranked as one of the greatest mathematicians of the twentieth century. In his obituary, fellow algebraist BL van der Waerden says that her mathematical originality was “absolute beyond comparison”, and Hermann Weyl said that Noether “changed the face of algebra by her work”. During her lifetime and even until today, Noether has been characterized as the greatest woman mathematician in recorded history by mathematicians such as Pavel Alexandrov, Hermann Weyl, and Jean Dieudonné.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmy_Noetherhttp://click-to-read-mo.re/p/6dFW

selfrescuingprincesssociety:

Emmy Noether (23 March 1882 – 14 April 1935)

Emmy Noether was an influential German mathematician known for her groundbreaking contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. Described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, Norbert Wiener and others as the most important woman in the history of mathematics, she revolutionized the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether’s theorem explains the fundamental connection between symmetry and conservation laws.

Noether is remembered by mathematicians as an algebraist and for her work in topology. Physicists appreciate her best for her famous theorem because of its far-ranging consequences for theoretical physics and dynamic systems. She showed an acute propensity for abstract thought, which allowed her to approach problems of mathematics in fresh and original ways.

Noether’s work continues to be relevant for the development of theoretical physics and mathematics and she is consistently ranked as one of the greatest mathematicians of the twentieth century. In his obituary, fellow algebraist BL van der Waerden says that her mathematical originality was “absolute beyond comparison”, and Hermann Weyl said that Noether “changed the face of algebra by her work”. During her lifetime and even until today, Noether has been characterized as the greatest woman mathematician in recorded history by mathematicians such as Pavel Alexandrov, Hermann Weyl, and Jean Dieudonné.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmy_Noether

http://click-to-read-mo.re/p/6dFW

historicwomen
historicwomen:

Frannie Lou Hamer 1917- 1977
Frannie Lou Hamer was born in Mississippi in the 20th Century, a time of intense racial discrimination in the South. Frannie was the youngest of twenty children and worked as a sharecropper, first with her family and then with her husband. Frannie and her husband, Perry, were unable to have children. While in surgery to remove a tumor, the doctor gave Frannie a hysterectomy without her consent. Frannie was outraged. Though she could no longer give birth, Frannie raised four adopted children. 
In 1962, Frannie registered to vote at a protest meeting where she met several civil rights activists. When she attempted to carry out this right, she and the 17 others who went to vote with her met opposition from law enforcement. She was fired from her job and driven from her home. She began working for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. She participated in and led acts of nonviolent civil disobedience and was often the victim of threats, arrests and violence. Frannie was even shot at.
Frannie helped found the Freedom Democratic Party and the National Women’s Political Caucus. She ran for congress, though unsuccessfully. In 1976, Frannie was diagnosed with breast cancer. She died the following year.  
In 1972, a unanimous resolution praising Frannie’s contributions to civil rights was passed in Mississippi. She received an honorary PhD from Howard University, among other humanitarian awards. 

historicwomen:

Frannie Lou Hamer 1917- 1977

Frannie Lou Hamer was born in Mississippi in the 20th Century, a time of intense racial discrimination in the South. Frannie was the youngest of twenty children and worked as a sharecropper, first with her family and then with her husband. Frannie and her husband, Perry, were unable to have children. While in surgery to remove a tumor, the doctor gave Frannie a hysterectomy without her consent. Frannie was outraged. Though she could no longer give birth, Frannie raised four adopted children. 

In 1962, Frannie registered to vote at a protest meeting where she met several civil rights activists. When she attempted to carry out this right, she and the 17 others who went to vote with her met opposition from law enforcement. She was fired from her job and driven from her home. She began working for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. She participated in and led acts of nonviolent civil disobedience and was often the victim of threats, arrests and violence. Frannie was even shot at.

Frannie helped found the Freedom Democratic Party and the National Women’s Political Caucus. She ran for congress, though unsuccessfully. In 1976, Frannie was diagnosed with breast cancer. She died the following year.  

In 1972, a unanimous resolution praising Frannie’s contributions to civil rights was passed in Mississippi. She received an honorary PhD from Howard University, among other humanitarian awards. 

medieval-women

medieval-women:

Medieval and Early Modern Women at War, a Few Notable Examples:

Aethelflaed of Mercia (statue pictured above) ruled part of England from 911 to 918. She was a formidable military tactician and defended her territory from the Vikings.

Emma Queen of the Franks, defended Laon in 927, and led a successful siege against Chateau Thierry in 933. She died in 934 whilst on a military campaign.

Empress Matilda and Matilda of Boulogne both commanded opposing armies during the Anarchy, a civil war that had England in chaos from 1135 to 1154.

Joan of Arc (portrait in armour above), a French peasant girl, became a military leader in the early 15th century, leading the French army in several successful battles against the English army in the last stages of the Hundred Years’ War.

Margaret of Anjou, married the simpleminded Henry VI of England in 1445 and educated her young son in “cutting off heads and making war.” She was a pivotal figure in the Wars of the Roses.

Note: wearable armour weighs from 15 - 28 kgs (35 - 60 lbs).

www.medievalweaponinfo.com/category/pole-weapons/

sometimesanihilist
sometimesanihilist:

Jeannette Rankin (1880 - 1973) was the first woman to serve in the US congress, in 1916 and again in 1943. 
She fought for women’s rights, including suffrage, birth control, and equal pay. She was a lifelong pacifist and activist for peace, and worked towards an antiwar constitutional amendment. She voted against the US entering WWI, and was also the only member to vote against going to war with Japan after Pearl Harbor (and barely escaped an angry mob afterward). 
“There can be no compromise with war; it cannot be reformed or controlled; cannot be disciplined into decency or codified into common sense; for war is the slaughter of human beings, temporarily regarded as enemies, on as large a scale as possible.” (1929)

sometimesanihilist:

Jeannette Rankin (1880 - 1973) was the first woman to serve in the US congress, in 1916 and again in 1943. 

She fought for women’s rights, including suffrage, birth control, and equal pay. She was a lifelong pacifist and activist for peace, and worked towards an antiwar constitutional amendment. She voted against the US entering WWI, and was also the only member to vote against going to war with Japan after Pearl Harbor (and barely escaped an angry mob afterward). 

There can be no compromise with war; it cannot be reformed or controlled; cannot be disciplined into decency or codified into common sense; for war is the slaughter of human beings, temporarily regarded as enemies, on as large a scale as possible.” (1929)

historical-nonfiction
historical-nonfiction:

The Varangians were the elite forces of the Byzantine army- much like the Praetorian Guard of ancient Rome or the Ottoman Janissaries.  They were originally made up exclusively of Vikings (which the empire had been hiring as mercenaries since the 9th century), but after the Norman Conquest of England a bunch of exiled Anglo-Saxons were added to the mix.  By the 12th century there were so many English that it was commonly being referred to as the ‘Anglo-Varangian’ Guard.  As the empire declined, the Varangians also fell on hard times.  By the middle of the 14th century they had largely ceased to function and the last mention of them is in the first decade of the 15th century. 

historical-nonfiction:

The Varangians were the elite forces of the Byzantine army- much like the Praetorian Guard of ancient Rome or the Ottoman Janissaries.  They were originally made up exclusively of Vikings (which the empire had been hiring as mercenaries since the 9th century), but after the Norman Conquest of England a bunch of exiled Anglo-Saxons were added to the mix.  By the 12th century there were so many English that it was commonly being referred to as the ‘Anglo-Varangian’ Guard.  As the empire declined, the Varangians also fell on hard times.  By the middle of the 14th century they had largely ceased to function and the last mention of them is in the first decade of the 15th century. 

mapsontheweb
mapsontheweb:

The world as a Civilization 5 map with world wonder sites marked



The aforementioned wonders for those who aren’t familiar are as follows:
Alhambra (Spain)
Angkor Wat
Big Ben (England)
Borobudur (Indonesia)
Brandenburg Gate (Germany)
Broadway (America)
Chichen Itza (Mexico, represented by the Aztecs)
CN Tower (Canada, represented by the Iroquois)
Cristo Redentor (Brazil)
Eiffel Tower (France)
Forbidden Palace (China)
Globe Theatre (England)
Great Mosque of Djenne (Mali, represented by Songhai)
Great Wall (China)
Hagia Sophia (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)
Himeji Castle (Japan)
Kremlin (Russia)
Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italy, represented by Venice)
The Louvre (France)
Machu Picchu (Peru, represented by the Inca)
Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)
Neuschwanstein (Germany)
Notre Dame (France)
Parthenon (Greece)
The Pentagon (America)
Petra
Prora (Germany)
Pyramids (Egypt)
Red Fort (India)
Sistine Chapel
Statue of Liberty (America)
Stonehenge (England)
Sydney Opera House
Taj Mahal (India)
Terracotta Army (China)
Uffizi (Italy, represented by Venice)
And here’s a video with in-game quotes and artwork.

mapsontheweb:

The world as a Civilization 5 map with world wonder sites marked

The aforementioned wonders for those who aren’t familiar are as follows:

Alhambra (Spain)

Angkor Wat

Big Ben (England)

Borobudur (Indonesia)

Brandenburg Gate (Germany)

Broadway (America)

Chichen Itza (Mexico, represented by the Aztecs)

CN Tower (Canada, represented by the Iroquois)

Cristo Redentor (Brazil)

Eiffel Tower (France)

Forbidden Palace (China)

Globe Theatre (England)

Great Mosque of Djenne (Mali, represented by Songhai)

Great Wall (China)

Hagia Sophia (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)

Himeji Castle (Japan)

Kremlin (Russia)

Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italy, represented by Venice)

The Louvre (France)

Machu Picchu (Peru, represented by the Inca)

Mausoleum of Halicarnassus (Turkey, represented by the Ottomans)

Neuschwanstein (Germany)

Notre Dame (France)

Parthenon (Greece)

The Pentagon (America)

Petra

Prora (Germany)

Pyramids (Egypt)

Red Fort (India)

Sistine Chapel

Statue of Liberty (America)

Stonehenge (England)

Sydney Opera House

Taj Mahal (India)

Terracotta Army (China)

Uffizi (Italy, represented by Venice)

And here’s a video with in-game quotes and artwork.